Melody of Deception – review
Broadway Theatre, Catford

Published: Friday, May 22, 2015 11:56 PM | Review by: Adeola Idowu | Afridiziak Star Rating:
Melody of Deception, Catford Broadway, UK (c) Jason Joseph Melody of Deception, Catford Broadway, UK (c) Jason Joseph

Melody of Deception is a play with a powerful message of hope and salvation. Not only will you laugh hard, but this play will take you on a roller coaster journey


After successful tours in Jamaica and Canada, the gospel stage play Melody of Deception by director Dr Elaine Brown Spencer of Kaleo Productions, made a riveting three-night debut in Birmingham and London UK. Melody Of Deception is undeniably one of the most encapsulating and worship-filled gospel plays I have seen in a long time. I must say; Dr Elaine Brown Spencer took a bold step by writing and directing this play and choosing to use theatre to minister to people.


Adapted from Dr Elaine’s earlier book Private Pain In Public Pews, Melody of Deception is a tale about deceit, betrayal and hope. The play deals with the reality of church secrets and the various struggles and private pains experienced by church members. The story centres around a bashful and modest character named ‘Humble Helen’ (Cheryl Morgan-Fowler) who after being single for so long, turns up to church one day with a brand new handsome husband named ‘Jessie’ (Matthew Rapley). Jessie manages to secure the role of the new musical director at his wife’s church.


Jessie carries an odd aura with him that even a few members of the church begin to pick up on, including the Bishop (Gregory Green) who doesn’t shy away from expressing his disapproval of him. As time elapses, it would seem the church itself is growing in number and the choir are sounding better with a new level of praise and worship, all thanks to Jessie. Although all is not as it seems, as soon after some time everyone is taken off guard when a series of disastrous and scandalous events unfold leaving the church locked in a web of deception.

Dr Elaine Brown Spencer took a bold step by writing and directing Melody of Deception and choosing to use theatre to minister to people.


The play teaches that people can appear one way in public, but have a totally different agenda behind closed doors. Most people are going through secret battles that we each may have no idea about. The play highlights that this is very much a reality within church and as we learn from the character of Jessie, there is usually a deeper reason for this. Melody of Deception touches on a number of themes such as rape, sexual abuse, mental illness and suicide amongst young people.


Melody of Deception, Catford Broadway, UK (c) Jason Joseph Melody of Deception, Catford Broadway, UK (c) Jason Joseph

The play teaches that people can appear one way in public, but have a totally different agenda behind closed doors.


One interesting bit about the stage play was the ability of the actors to draw the audience into full-blown gospel sessions. At many points the audience found themselves fully involved in all the Christian based activities in the stage play. There is no denying the beauty and power in the voices of characters such as the Bishop’s Wife (Londa Larmond), ‘Jesse’ and ‘Minister Terry’ (Aadin).


Anyone who watches this play will not forget the entertaining, clever and sharp-tongued character of The Bishop, played by Gregory Green. He was effortlessly funny and often had the audience roaring with laughter. Not only was he entertaining but also full of wisdom and provided nuggets of advice that even the audience would at times respond to in a congressional like manner.


The only drawbacks had to be long intervals between scenes these could have led wandering minds to stray from the plot. However the long breaks are quickly forgotten as soon as the actors appear back on stage. Also, the play was adapted as if it was set in the UK, perhaps to suit the British audience, but this was a little odd as the cast were still evidently Canadian (with Caribbean heritage). Most of the characters used Canadian accents and colloquialisms typical within Northern America or amongst African Americans in the Unites States. The play was already so engaging that this wasn’t entirely necessary and a predominately British audience would still have fallen in love and accepted the play without this.

At many points the audience found themselves fully involved in all the Christian based activities in the stage play.


Melody of Deception is a play with a powerful message of hope and salvation. Not only will you laugh hard, but this play will take you on a roller coaster journey, you will feel compelled to cheer characters on, worship along with the cast and at one point you may even find yourself praying! I would highly recommend for more people to go and watch this play and sincerely hope it returns to the UK so that more people get a chance to experience it.



Info: For more information on Dr Spencer’s books, stage plays, CD’s and tour dates, visit kaleoproduction.com



Related links

Dr Elaine Brown Spencer - interview




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