I Think We Are Alone – review

Written by Sally Abbott
Theatre Royal Stratford East
Review by: Ronke Lawal
Published: Wednesday, 04 March 2020, 09:37am
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I Think We Are Alone is a layered story of the complexities of human relationships and how we carry these complexities throughout our lives holding onto the burden of inner turmoil which very often makes us feel alone. It is set over two different time periods allowing us to see the impact of life and death in what appears initially to be real time which adds a poignant framing to the way the scenes play out and are pulled together in Act 2.

The entire cast was brilliant, Chizzy Akudolu (Josie) and Andrew Turner (Graham) particularly stood out in the way they represented grief and strength through their pain – showing us that being strong all the time should not be the goal.

Starting first with a series of monologues we are introduced to some of the central characters. We are initially left wondering how these are interlinked particularly given the knowledge that the two sisters, Claire and Ange form the overarching base of the play’s storyline, but things start to make sense as we go deeper into the play.

And this play is deep. Can it be described as a dark comedy? Perhaps, we certainly laughed at key moments throughout the play and yet the dark and painful themes that were played out reminds us how easy it is for us to pretend that everything is OK even when everything is far from being OK. The entire cast was brilliant, Chizzy Akudolu (Josie) and Andrew Turner (Graham) particularly stood out in the way they represented grief and strength through their pain – showing us that being strong all the time should not be the goal.

As complex as human beings are, our need for love and forgiveness keeps us rooted in faith and hope.

The stage, lighting and sound provide the perfect atmospheric backdrop for the moments of angst, isolation and emotional despair. Sally Abbott handles some difficult themes with the care and attention of a writer who wants to leave her audience with hope, not just with trauma. As complex as human beings are, our need for love and forgiveness keeps us rooted in faith and hope. Kathy Burke and Scott Graham have brought us an important production here – go and see it.



NEED TO KNOW: I Think We Are Alone is at Theatre Royal Stratford East until 21 March 2020 | Book Tickets